Tag Archives: anarchist’s lullaby

All profits from sales of Anarchist’s Lullaby will be donated to Black Lives Matter.

Hey all, Katie here temporarily. Very temporarily. For those of you who don’t know, I recently had surgery, and am still healing.

I wanted to talk to you before Anarchist’s Lullaby goes live.

When your credit cards are charged for the preorder of Anarchist’s Lullaby, and going forward, any profits from Anarchist’s Lullaby will go to do critical work protecting some of the communities most impacted by racism and systemic persecution. I’m thrilled to say that 100% of the profits from Anarchists Lullaby will be donated to Black Lives Matter.

I’d wanted to do that from the day I uploaded the book for preorder, but with my family struggling through a particularly rough patch, I knew we might need every penny for the medications keeping me alive long enough to cash the royalty cheque. But since we had a bit of a windfall, that’s no longer a strong enough reason to justify keeping that money for myself.

Sure, there’s an argument to be made that it wouldn’t be fair to expect me to NOT get paid for that work, given how very hard I worked on it. That the dichotomy that says it’s better to be a starving artist than a sellout is a way in which capitalists try to restrict artists’ view of their power and justify paying them less. But that argument wasn’t anywhere near a strong enough pull to keep me from feeling that in this case, I DON’T want to be paid for this piece of art.

Many of the issues that it would have been impossible to write Anarchist’s Lullaby without addressing aren’t ones that affect me directly. So it wouldn’t seem right to keep the profit on a story shot through with other people’s pain, struggles that affect whether those in my community live or die, such as Quanice Derrick Hayes, a black seventeen year old who was murdered by the Portland Police not so long before I stuck my face into the main city for my recent surgery. No community, no matter how liberal or forward-thinking on the surface, is free of issues stemming from racial injustice. In hyper-liberal Portland, people of color still routinely suffer from police brutality, and violence that is but an extension of systemic hostility tracing back to when Oregon was founded as a “white paradise.” It’s a reminder not to believe the whitewashing, that somehow your community is untouched by injustice.

Many, many causes are gonna need all the donations they can get over the next few years, but I chose Black Lives Matter because their work seems PARTICULARLY urgent. With a government that even now is taking away the few constraints that exist on law enforcement to hold our authorities accountable for racism, brutality, and corruption, and that condemns the post-election wave of violence building toward racial minorities here so little that it could even be construed as endorsing it, Black Lives Matter’s work is more important than ever.

I want to thank you for choosing to purchase Anarchist’s Lullaby, and reading my stories.

<3

Katie

Romance is political. Period.

I wrote a political book. Not a “well, I’ll try to toe the line between subversive and mainstream, and try to seed new ideas in quietly” balancing act, but a make-your-eyes-bleed polemic diatribe of a story.
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Political things are not always well-received in our pop culture, including in romance. “I read to escape.” “I’m tired of the negativity.” And so on and so on.
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But can I let you in on a secret?
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Romance is political.
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Love is political.
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It was when women were expected to marry strangers for stability or economic need, and come to discover good traits in their partners after the wedding. In such an environment, a romance that showed a woman that she shouldn’t have to be unhappy was a deeply political act of rebellion against those who would rather she bore her distress in silence.
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It was when the Lovings were forbidden from marrying by laws against miscegenation. When the “white slavery” panic created laws such as the Mann Act to punish interracial couples by portraying men of color and foreigners as evil, lustful deceivers who would lure good (white) men’s wives into prostitution and sin.
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It was when same-sex couples were forbidden from marriage. (Or are, if a new Supreme Court and Congress overturns that precedent). In many areas, small public displays of affection such as handholding or kissing are still deeply political acts.
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For a woman to read a book that tells her that she deserves someone amazing who enriches her personal growth is a deeply political act in a world in which half the population still thinks she should be legally required to be submissive to her male partner.
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For a woman to read a book that explores her sexuality, and treats her sexual wants as relevant and necessary to the success of a relationship is a deeply political act in a world in which women’s sexuality is still held up for public contempt and harassment.
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For a woman- especially a woman of color- to read a book in which people of color are portrayed as desirable, it is a political statement. And the reverse. When we only consume entertainment showing white couples, or straight couples, it is a political statement.
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For millions of women to spend billions on books that affirm these values despite being treated like a cultural punchline is a deeply political statement.
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So yes. I wrote something political. If I’m lucky I’ll never write something so political again.
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And by choosing to read it, or similar political works, or not, you’re doing something just as political, too.
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Anarchist’s Lullaby is now available for preorder, with a March release.