Tag Archives: music

Review: Meg Myers’ Take Me to the Disco

Meg Myers is some of my favorite mood music for suspense and angst- ever since she blared into my world scream-singing “You’re in my heart, in my heart, in my head,” (Heart, heart, head) and “Sorry that I lost our love, without a reason why,” (Sorry) and “I’ve gotta hunt you, I want to bring you to my hell”(Desire). She has a particular talent for walking the line between anguished, sultry, self-punishing, and desperate. In other words, the perfect music for the third-act black moment, or for a twisted game of cat-and-mouse.

For those seeking more of her plaintive screams, you may be disappointed. Perhaps some of it is that it’s difficult to maintain a career built on that sort of vocal technique long term, and perhaps some of it is simply that her choice of producers and songs didn’t mesh as well with the old style, but Take Me to the Disco is in many ways quieter- instrumentations are often minimalistic, augmented mainly by piano, strings, and “atmosphere” aside from the beat, more alt-pop ballads suitable for dancing. 

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Dancer Playlist: Candy

Candy’s music’s all over the place. From upbeat pop, rap, and EDM, to songs tinged with bittersweet longing and tragedy… She’s a wild card. You never know quite what you’ll get, since it’s whatever feels fun to her in the moment.

Candy knows what she’s doing, and her music reflects that. Powerful women stalking their prey, and dancing without a care. She can be out of control or brazen at times, but that’s part of her charm.

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Dancer Playlist: Lia

I’ve been so swamped with new stories, I’ve gotten behind on sharing playlists and such with you guys! Starting with Lia’s.

Lots of classic rock, and a handful of newer songs with an updated classic rock vibe. Lia doesn’t try to play to current tastes- she picks the stuff that makes her customers feel young. If she gets a younger DJ, it might take a little negotiation to get a fuller playlist for a busy night shift, but her songs will be a respite for older guys who’re put off by all the pop and rap stuff. And there’s money to be made in that.

Love and lapdances!

Katie

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Dancer Playlist: Malia

With Malia live, it’s time to talk about her music! She likes it slow, a little aggressive, and if it has an orchestral hook, all the better.

Oftentimes, Malia’s music isn’t clubworthy; when it can be incorporated into a set, it’s entirely because of her capacity as a performer. Rules are meant to be broken and all that.

But it’s lyrical, often melancholy, and it suits her.

Malia Promo copy

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Queen of Clubs: Cora’s Playlist

Okay- so a dancer’s playlist is a very personal thing.  Sometimes, it strikes a balance between her persona and her clients- grown men don’t want to listen to Taylor Swift, no matter how confident her music makes the dancer feel- and sometimes it’s something that says a lot about the dancer.

Cora’s music is slow, sexy, and sometimes at odds with the club’s playlist.  But it’s perfect for a night at home, with low lighting.

Cora’s Playlist

Goapele Play

Janelle Monae Primetime

Of course we would begin with those two, since they’re her first set ever, and such a memorable one, at that. But it goes on.

 

Nick Cave Cannibal’s Hymn

Tom Waits Going Out West

Miranda Sex Garden Peepshow

Doja Cat So High

Lovage Strangers On A Train

Lovage Stroker Ace

Handsome Boy Modeling School I’ve Been Thinking

Tinashe 2 On

Lissie Mother (Danzig Cover)

DJ Logik Spider Song

Massive Attack Five Man Army

Pearl Jam Pendulum

Bastille No Angels

 

What’s on your dream playlist?

Music Review: Lana Del Rey’s Ultraviolence, Track By Track

For another good review of the album, though not track-by-track, you might enjoy Times’ review. I certainly did- it summed up my feelings mostly perfectly, by tying it in with some of the nostalgia that is coming to dominate our culture, and looking at the ways we use it as a shorthand to avoid exploring alternate ideas.

“I keep looking deeper into Ultraviolence because I want to understand what Del Rey is trying to understand. I want to know why the culture around me keeps grasping at past emblems — why advertising for 40-year-old movies still decorates college dorm rooms, why I can make my iPhone look like a Polaroid, why 90,000 people sing along to roots rock at Bonnaroo. I want to know why we reuse these tropes uncritically, reaching for analog without asking what gives it power. Lana Del Rey looks at the imagery we keep and tries to find what’s missing in it. What do we avoid looking at when we buy pictures of Marilyn Monroe, not thinking of why Norma Jeane Mortenson died so young? Whose stories do we allow to remain subdued?”

Continue reading Music Review: Lana Del Rey’s Ultraviolence, Track By Track